Undergraduate Academic Policies

Degree Requirements

To graduate from Bellarmine University with a baccalaureate degree, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Complete a minimum of 126 semester hours and achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00.
  2. Complete a minimum of 24 semester hours in upper-level courses. These 24 hours are exclusive of the General Education Requirements.
  3. Complete the minimum course requirements for a major.
  4. Complete at Bellarmine University a minimum of 36 semester hours, including at least 12 semester hours in the degree major.
  5. Complete the General Education Requirements. In some cases, the minimum course requirements for a major include courses that also satisfy General Education Requirements.

General Education Requirements

The very heart of the university curriculum is the liberal arts core, which consists of a body of general education courses required of all students. These requirements have a twofold purpose. They seek, first of all, to help students develop the skills of a liberally educated person: reading, writing, thinking, and speaking. Secondly, and most importantly, they seek, through the use of these skills, to help students acquire a breadth and depth of vision by exploring the humanizing disciplines, those that expand the mind and soul and challenge us to realize the full range of our human potentiality.

Through the study of the fine arts, language and literature, history, mathematics, the natural and social sciences, and philosophy and theology, students acquire an appreciation for the cultural achievements of past generations and the ability to make a meaningful contribution to their own. Philosophy and theology play a special role in the university curriculum, since they raise the ultimate questions concerning the meaning and purpose of human existence. By exploring these questions from the perspective of both faith and reason, the basic compatibility of religious belief and the quest for truth become evident. These two fundamental disciplines also give the whole curriculum an integrative focus, providing a spiritual and intellectual context within which to view the various realms of human endeavor.

Bellarmine’s General Education courses form a set of common educational experiences designed to meet faculty expectations for student learning in the following areas basic to a liberal arts education in the Catholic intellectual tradition: In the course of completing our General Education curriculum, students will demonstrate the following:

  1. Knowledge of philosophical approaches vital to an understanding of ultimate truth, the nature of the self, and a good life.
  2. Knowledge of Christian theology and its ongoing dialogue with other religious and intellectual traditions.
  3. Understanding of the historical development of the modern world.
  4. Comparative understanding of the world’s peoples, place, and cultures.
  5. Familiarity with principles and practices in the natural sciences.
  6. Familiarity with principles and practices in the social sciences.
  7. Familiarity with forms and creative processes in literature and the arts.
  8. Quantitative reasoning using graphical and symbolic representations.
  9. Critical thinking skills.
  10. Facility in oral and written communication.

General Education Requirements

General Education consists of a minimum of 49 hours of course work selected from the options listed. No course may be used to fulfill more than one general education requirement. Transfer students who enter Bellarmine with 24 hours or more of transfer credit are exempt from Freshman Focus and Freshman Seminar. For more information on IDC waiver policies, see the Interdisciplinary Studies Program section of the Catalog.

Hrs. Requirement Course Options
1 hr. Freshman Focus IDC. 100 Freshman Focus
3 hrs. Freshman Seminar IDC. 101 Freshman Seminar
3 hrs. English Composition ENGL 101 Expository Writing
3 hrs. Literature ENGL 200 Reading Literature
ENGL 201 The World of Texts
ENGL 207 American Literature Survey I
ENGL 208 American Literature Survey II
ENGL 209 British Literature Survey I
ENGL 210 British Literature Survey II
3 hrs. Western Tradition HIST 116 Western World I (1450 – 1870)
HIST 117 Western World II (1870 – present)
3 hrs. Fine & Performing Arts Any 3 hour course in Art, Art History, Music, or Theater
For Art, Arts Administration, Music, Music Technology, and Theatre majors, the General Education requirement in Fine & Performing Arts must be taken outside the major department or major emphasis area.
3 hrs. Mathematics MATH 101 Foundations of Mathematics I
MATH 107 Mathematics for Liberal Arts
MATH 116 Precalculus
MATH 117 Calculus I
MATH 125 Business Calculus
MATH 200 Statistics and Society
MATH 205 Elementary Statistics
6 hrs. Natural Sciences Any two courses that include a laboratory component in Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, or Physics.
3 hrs. Social Sciences ANTH 111 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ECON 110 Principles of Macroeconomics
GEOG 175 Introduction to Human Geography
P.S. 101 American Government
PSYC 103 Introductory Psychology
SOC. 101 Introduction to Sociology
For Criminal Justice Studies, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology majors, the General Education requirement in the Social Sciences must be taken outside the major department.
6 hrs. Philosophy PHIL 160 Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 301 Ethics
6 hrs. Theology THEO 200 Ultimate Questions
and one course selected from the 300-400 level Theology courses
3 hrs. Sophomore Seminar IDC. 200 Sophomore U.S. Experience
3 hrs. Junior Seminar IDC. 301 Junior Transcultural Experience
3 hrs. Senior Seminar IDC. 401 Senior Seminar

Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement

All undergraduate, degree-seeking students who matriculated into Bellarmine University in Fall 2010 or after, and who are majoring in a Bachelor of Arts degree in Bellarmine College, must complete the foreign language proficiency requirement in order to satisfy graduation requirements.  The requirement is met by proving foreign language proficiency through the 102 level. 

The requirement can be met in a variety of ways:

  • Beginners with no foreign language background should enroll in 6 credits of a foreign language at Bellarmine University; 101 and 102 of the desired language.
  • Students who have taken the WebCAPE placement exam and whose WebCAPE score placed them into 102 (or higher) should enroll in the 102 (or higher) course of that language.  In this case, successful completion of 102 alone (or a single higher level course) will satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.  Note: the WebCAPE exam does not fulfill the foreign language proficiency requirement nor does it award the student college credit, it is for placement purposes only.  See the WebCAPE Language Score Placement Guide below to determine course placement level for registration.
  • Students whose WebCAPE score placed them above the 102 level are eligible to take the STAMP proficiency test.  Students must earn a minimum score of 3 in all three areas of the STAMP test (reading, writing, speaking) in order to fulfill the foreign language proficiency requirement.  Note: the STAMP test does not award the student college credit.
  • Students may earn Bellarmine credit and satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement for a course equal to 102 by transferring an AP, IB, or CLEP exam score.  See the Registrar's Office website at www.bellarmine.edu for minimum scores required.
  • Transfer students may earn Bellarmine credit for a college level course equal to or above 102 which will be determined at the point of admission.

For further details and other specific instructions about meeting the requirement, please see the Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement at Bellarmine University on the Global Languages and Cultures webpage.

WebCAPE Language Score Placement Guide (last revised 4/8/2010)
 

WebCAPE SPANISH Score Placement
Score of: Places you into:

  • below 296: Spanish 101
  • 296 – 355: Spanish 102 (or 325 to 355 places you in Spanish 111)
  • 356 – 439: Spanish 201
  • 440 – 524: Spanish 202
  • 525 – 600: Spanish 211
  • above 600: Spanish 212
  • Scores above 600: see the Global Languages Department Chair for placement

WebCAPE FRENCH Score Placement
Score of: Places you into:

  • below 281: French 101
  • 281 – 345: French 102
  • 346 – 402: French 201
  • 403 – 474: French 202
  • 475 – 550: French 211
  • above 550: French 212
  • Scores above 550: see the Global Languages Department Chair for placement

WebCAPE GERMAN Score Placement
Score of: Places you into:

  • below 328: German 101
  • 328 – 416: German 102
  • 417 – 547: German 201
  • 548 – 624: German 202
  • 625 – 700: German 211
  • above 700: German 212
  • Scores above 700: see the Global Languages Department Chair for placement

Locating WebCAPE and STAMP Scores

  • Students who have completed the WebCAPE exam and the STAMP test can find their scores in my.Bellarmine under the Academic Info Tab found by clicking the Personal Info link (located directly next to their login name).
  • Advisors can find WebCAPE and STAMP scores for their advisees in my.Bellarmine through the advisee roster under the Academic History link on the Advisee Details screen.  Those advisors with access to students' Nolij web folders (online advising folder) can view placement information there.

Majors, Minors, and Certificates

The majors and minors offered by the university allow students to build upon the broad foundation of the liberal arts core by specializing in one or more areas of study. The wide variety of available majors and minors provides students with opportunities for further self-enrichment and also prepares students for advanced studies and professional careers. Students may choose from among the majors and minors offered in the Bellarmine College, the W. Fielding Rubel School of Business, the Annsley Frazier Thornton School of Education, the Donna and Allan Lansing School of Nursing and Health Sciences, the School of Continuing and Professional Studies, the School of Communication, and the Regional Center for Environmental Studies. 

All students are required to major in one area selected from the available majors listed below. The university also recognizes double majors, provided that all requirements for both majors have been satisfactorily completed. Students may also minor or double minor. All majors require a minimum of 24 semester hours. All minors require a minimum of 18 semester hours.

Majors

Bachelor of Arts (BA) Majors Bachelor of Science (BS) Majors
Accounting Actuarial Science
Art: Digital Art Applied Information Technology
Art: Painting Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Art: Photography Biology (also a BA option)
Art: Sculpture & Extended Media Chemistry (also a BA option) 
Arts Administration: Art Computer Engineering 
Arts Administration: Music Education, Secondary 
Arts Administration: Theatre Environmental Science 
Biology (also a BS option) Mathematics (also a BA option) 
Business Administration Physics 
Chemistry (also a BS option)  
Communication  
Computer Science  
Criminal Justice Studies  
Design, Arts, and Technology Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Major  
Economics Nursing 
Education, Elementary and Learning & Behavior Disorders  
Education, Middles School and Learning & Behavior Disorders  
English  
Environmental Studies Bachelor of Health Science (BHS) Majors  
Exercise Science Medical Laboratory Science
Finance Physical Therapy (graduate program early-entry option only)
Foreign Languages and International Studies Respiratory Therapy
History  
Liberal Studies  
Mathematics (also a BS option)  
Music: Instrumental  
Music: Jazz  
Music: Piano Pedagogy and Accompanying  
Music: Sacred Music  
Music: Vocal  
Music Technology  
Philosophy  
Political Science  
Psychology  
Psychology: Human Resources  
Psychology: Human Services  
Sociology  
Spanish  
Theatre  
Theology  

Minors

Accounting
Anthropology
Art
Art History
Biochemistry
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Communication
Computer Science
Criminal Justice Studies
Economics
English
Environmental Studies
French
German
Healthcare
History
International Studies
Mathematics
Music
Peace Studies
Philosophy
Philosophy: Applied Ethics
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Sports Studies
Theatre
Theology
Writing

Certificates

Two undergraduate certificate programs are currently available for qualified students.  Information is available in their respecive academic program pages of the catalog.

Waiver and Exception Policy

A student seeking a waiver of a degree requirement or an exception to an academic policy must submit a petition as follows:

  1. The student obtains a Waiver and Exceptions Petition Form from the Office of the Registrar and submits the completed form along with an unofficial transcript to the appropriate dean. A completed form includes the recommendation and signature of the chair of the department in which the student is majoring and the recommendation and signature of the chair of the department that offers the course or oversees the policy with respect to which the waiver or exception is requested.
  2. The Dean considers the student’s petition and makes a decision. The Office of the Registrar then informs the student of the dean’s decision.  The dean's decision is final.

Academic Honesty

Bellarmine University is an academic community. It exists for the sake of the advancement of knowledge; the pursuit of truth; the intellectual, ethical, and social development of students; and the general well being of society. All members of our community have an obligation to themselves, to their peers, and to the institution to uphold the integrity of Bellarmine University. In the area of academic honesty, this means that one’s work should be one’s own and that the instructor’s evaluation should be based on the student’s own efforts and understanding. When the standards of academic honesty are breached, mutual trust is undermined, the ideals of personal responsibility and autonomy are violated, teaching and learning are severely compromised, and other goals of the academic community cannot be realized.

Students and faculty must be fully aware of what constitutes academic dishonesty; claims of ignorance cannot be used to justify or rationalize dishonest acts. Academic dishonesty can take a number of forms, including but not limited to cheating, plagiarism, fabrication, aiding and abetting, multiple submissions, obtaining unfair advantage, and unauthorized access to academic or administrative systems.

Cheating includes receiving or giving help on papers, experiments, reports, compositions, projects, or examinations without the instructor’s permission. It also includes submitting part of or all of the completed assignment of another student as one’s own work. Of special note and concern is the use of purchased research papers. It is a violation of the regulations of Bellarmine University for a student to purchase a term paper. Cheating is also using unauthorized materials and aids, such as books, one’s own notes or those of another, and calculators or other electronic devices during an examination.

Plagiarism is the fraudulent misrepresentation of any part of another person’s work as one’s own. Submitting any writing, including take-home exams or other assignments, that does not properly acknowledge the quoting or paraphrasing of another person’s words or that fails to give proper credit for another person’s ideas, opinion, or theory, is plagiarism. Any unacknowledged use of sources to which one is indebted, including but not limited to music, video, audio, theatre projects, compositions, web site, and computer software, constitutes plagiarism.

Fabrication is the falsification or invention of information or data in reports, lab results, bibliographies, or any other academic undertaking.

Aiding and abetting is assisting someone in an act of academic dishonesty by providing material, information, or other assistance that violates academic integrity; or providing false information in connection with any inquiry regarding academic integrity.

Multiple submissions is submitting identical papers or course work for credit in more than one course without prior permission of the instructor.

Obtaining unfair advantage includes the theft, alteration, destruction, or obstruction of another student’s work. This may take the form of theft, defacement, or destruction of resources, e.g., library periodicals and books, so as to deprive other students of information. It also includes gaining or providing access to examination materials prior to the time authorized by an instructor; engaging in unauthorized collaboration on an academic assignment; retaining, possessing, or circulating previously used examination materials if specifically told not to use them; obstructing or interfering with another student’s academic work; or engaging in any activity designed to obtain an unfair advantage over another student in the same course.

Unauthorized access is viewing or altering computer records in any way, modifying computer programs or systems, releasing or distributing information gathered via unauthorized access, or in any way interfering with the use or availability of computer systems/information.

Procedures to Follow in Cases of Academic Dishonesty

I. The student’s act of academic dishonesty takes place in a course in which the student is enrolled. Initial sanctions may be imposed by the instructor or the appropriate dean.

1. Imposition of sanctions by the instructor

a. The instructor has a conference with the student. The instructor should explain the nature and basis of the allegation of academic dishonesty. The student must be provided with the opportunity to respond verbally and in writing.
b. The instructor has the option of consulting with his/her department chair in order to determine whether an infraction has occurred. The department chair may attend the conference with the student. Deans of the colleges or schools without department chairs may appoint a faculty consultant for the same purpose. The instructor may apply other procedures formally agreed to within his/her college or school.
c. If the instructor concludes that the alleged infraction did take place, the instructor is required to report this in writing to the student within seven university working days (defined as days Bellarmine University administrative offices are officially open) after the conference. A copy of the report will be sent to the dean of the college or school within which the course in question is housed, to the dean of the student’s college or school, and to the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs (AVPAA). The report will state the nature of the offense and the penalty imposed. The penalty will be determined by the faculty member in consultation with the chair and/or dean.
d. The instructor’s choice of penalty ranges from a minimum penalty of failing the assignment or test to failing the course itself. The Office of the Registrar should be informed immediately when the penalty is an “F” for the course so that the student may not withdraw from the course and receive a “W.” This grade may be changed subject to the outcome of an appeal.
e. It is generally assumed that graduate students fully understand what accounts for academic dishonesty. Thus, no leniency of penalty will be applied in cases involving graduate students.

2. Imposition of sanctions by the dean of the college or school in which the course is housed, or the IDC Director if an IDC course
is involved

a. Under unusual circumstances, the instructor may request that the dean of the appropriate college or school, or the dean’s designee, handle the allegation of academic dishonesty. The instructor may opt for this course of action either before or after a conference with the student accused of academic dishonesty. In either case, if the dean or his/her designee decides to handle the allegation of academic dishonesty, the dean or his/her designee will have a conference with the student, explain the nature and basis of the allegation, and provide the student with the opportunity to respond. The dean or his/her designee may invite the instructor to attend the conference.
b. If the dean or his/her designee concludes that the student did commit the alleged infraction, the dean or his/her designee will impose a penalty and follow the procedures described in I.1 (c) and I.1 (d).

3. Actions by the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs

a. After receiving a report of an act of academic dishonesty, the AVPAA or his/her designee may determine that the act of academic dishonesty warrants further sanctions than those imposed by the instructor or appropriate dean. The AVPAA  has the authority to determine a more stringent penalty for the reported act of academic dishonesty.
b. If a previous incident of academic dishonesty has been reported to the Office of Academic Affairs, the AVPAA will take either action outlined below:

i. Record of one prior offense - dismissal for the semester subsequent to the one in which the second offense took place.  This sanction is in addition to the penalty imposed by the instructor.  The academic transcript will note academic dismissal at the close of the semester in which the second offense took place.  The student may apply for readmission after the lapse of one complete semester (fall or spring). 
ii. Record of two prior offenses - immediate and permanent dismissal.  This sanction is in addition to the penalty imposed by the instructor.  The academic transcript will note academic dismissal for the semester in which the third offense took place.

c. The AVPAA will report his/her decision in writing to the student within 10 university working days. A copy of the report will be sent to the dean of the student’s college or school. The report will mention how the action can be appealed. 

4. Appeal

a. If the student seeks to appeal the penalty imposed by the instructor, the student should initiate the appeal in writing to the dean of his/her college or school within seven university working days after receiving the instructor’s report stating the penalty. There must be some clear basis for the appeal, such as availability of new evidence.
b. The dean or his/her designee will have a conference with the student within 10 university working days after receiving the notice of the student’s request to appeal. The student will be informed in writing of the dean’s or his/her designee's action within seven university working days after the conference. The report will mention how the decision can be appealed if warranted. A copy of the report will be sent to the instructor and the appropriate dean.
c. If the student seeks to further appeal an action by the dean of his/her college or school, the student must initiate the appeal in writing to the AVPAA within seven days after receiving the written report stating the action. This request for an appeal will then be forwarded to the Academic Honesty Appeal Board.
d. If the student seeks to appeal an action by the AVPAA, the student must initiate the appeal in writing to him or her within seven university working days after receiving the written report stating the action. This request for an appeal will then be forwarded to the Academic Honesty Appeal Board.
e. The appeal board shall conduct a hearing only if two or more members of the board believe that the student may have suffered some injustice due to substantive or procedural error (such as availability of new evidence, demonstrable bias in earlier decision led to a fundamentally unfair decision, etc.). Within 15 university working days after submitting the appeal to the board, the student and faculty member involved will be informed in writing whether a hearing will be held. The student must be given at least 10 university working days after being informed that a hearing will be held to prepare for the hearing.  See the Academic Grievance policy for details about the hearing process. 
f. In the event that the appeal board determines that a hearing is not necessary, this decision is not appealable.
g. The appeal board may modify any appealed decision as it deems appropriate. The decision of the appeal board will be reported in writing to the student within seven university working days after the hearing. A copy of the report will be sent to the instructor, the dean of the student’s college, and the AVPAA.
h. The student may appeal the appeal board’s decision to the AVPAA, who may reconsider the decision based only upon evidence clearly not available at the original hearing. Such an appeal is discretionary.

5. Formation of the Committee

a. At the beginning of each academic year, the Faculty Council shall appoint ten full-time faculty members to serve in a pool from which are drawn members of the Academic Grievance Committee (see the Academic Grievance policy) and the Academic Honesty Appeal Board as the need arises. Every effort shall be made to ensure that at least one faculty member from each school is represented within the pool.
b. At the beginning of each academic year, the Student Government Association shall appoint five undergraduate students to serve in a pool from which are drawn members of the Academic Grievance Committee and Academic Honesty Appeal Board as the need arises. Three graduate students will also be appointed by the AVPAA in consultation with the graduate program directors and/or school deans.
c. The Academic Honesty Appeal Board is comprised of a faculty chair, two faculty members, and two students. The AVPAA will appoint the committee chair, who will not belong to the same department involved in the alleged act of academic dishonesty.
d. The student members shall be from the same academic level (graduate or undergraduate) as the grievant, but none of the student members shall be enrolled in the same major as the grievant, and none may be or have been enrolled in the same section, during the same semester, of the course in which the act of academic dishonesty allegedly occurred.

II. The student’s act of academic dishonesty is related to a course in which the student is NOT enrolled.

1. The instructor whose course is involved has a conference with the student and the dean of the appropriate college or school, or the dean’s designee. If the allegation of academic dishonesty is reported by a person other than the instructor whose course is involved, this person may be invited to attend the conference.
2. If the dean or his/her designee concludes after consultation with the instructor that the alleged infraction did take place, this will be reported in writing to the student within seven university working days after the conference with the student. A copy of the report will be sent to the AVPAA. The report will state the nature of the offense and the penalty to be imposed. The report will also inform the student that the AVPAA may impose an additional penalty if prior offenses have been recorded.
3. The AVPAA will take further action according to the procedures stated in I.3.
4. The student may appeal according to the procedures outlined in I.4 (c)-(f).

III. The student’s act of dishonesty takes place in a computer facility.

System managers or other individuals will report any instance of academic dishonesty that takes place in a computer facility to the AVPAA, who will decide which procedure for academic dishonesty should be followed.

Academic Grievance Policy

Students of Bellarmine University who believe they have been treated unfairly with respect to academic matters or believe they have been discriminated against in any matter on the basis of race, color, disability, religion, age, national origin, gender, or sexual orientation may initiate and pursue the grievance procedure in accordance with the provisions of this policy. Academic matters are those concerned with instructional activities, research activities, grading procedures, or decisions involving instruction or affecting academic freedom. Student grievances regarding academic matters are addressed according to the procedure outlined below. All grievances of a non-academic nature are addressed as outlined in the Student Non-Academic Grievance Policy, found in the Student Handbook.

If it is unclear whether a grievance is academic or non-academic, the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs (AVPAA) or his/her designee and the Vice President for Student Affairs (VPSA) or his/her designee will determine the appropriate grievance procedure.

1. Preliminary Steps

To initiate or pursue an academic grievance, the following steps must be observed before the third week of the semester following the term in which the alleged grievance occurred:

a. The grievant should first discuss the matter with the person or persons directly involved in an attempt to resolve the grievance through informal discussion.
b. If there is no resolution, the grievant should discuss the matter with the department chairperson to whom those directly involved report (or if the department chairperson is directly involved, with the school dean; if the school dean is directly involved, with the AVPAA), who shall attempt to reach an informal resolution.
c. If there is no resolution through the department chairperson, the grievant should discuss the matter with the dean of the school in which the involved faculty member teaches (unless the school dean is directly involved), who shall attempt to reach an informal resolution.
d. If reconciliation has still not been achieved, the grievant shall submit to the Academic Grievance Committee, through the AVPAA, a written statement of the grievance. The statement shall contain:

i. a brief narrative of the condition giving rise to the grievance, including a summary of any attempts at reaching an informal resolution to the matter;
ii. a designation of the parties involved; and
iii. a concise statement of the remedy requested.

If the grievance involves a dispute over a grade or grading procedures, then the student must include with the statement a copy of the course syllabus for the course in which the grade was earned, as well as any other support materials (e.g., graded papers, exams, or assignments) that might support the grievant’s case.

2. Formation of the Committee

a. At the beginning of each academic year, the Faculty Council shall appoint ten full-time faculty members to serve in a pool from which are drawn members of the Academic Grievance Committee and the Academic Honesty Appeal Board (see the Academic Honesty policy) as the need arises. Every effort shall be made to ensure that at least one faculty member from
each school is represented within the pool.
b. At the beginning of each academic year, the Student Government Association shall appoint five undergraduate students to serve in a pool from which are drawn members of the Academic Grievance Committee and Academic Honesty Appeal Board as the need arises. Three graduate students will also be appointed by the AVPAA in consultation with the graduate program directors and/or school deans.
c. The Academic Grievance Committee is comprised of a faculty chair, two faculty members, and two students. The AVPAA will appoint the committee chair, who will not belong to the same department involved in the grievance.
d. The student members shall be from the same academic level (graduate or undergraduate) as the grievant, but none of the student members shall be enrolled in the same major as the grievant, and none may be or have beenenrolled in the same section, during the same semester, of the course in which the grievance allegedly occurred.

3. Committee Action

Upon receipt of the written statement of an academic grievance and the accompanying statement of response from the faculty member named in the grievance, the Academic Grievance Committee shall:

a. Determine prior to considering the grievance whether discussions between the student, persons directly involved, department chairperson, and school dean have been exhausted in attempting to resolve the grievance informally. Such discussions must be completed prior to the third week of the semester following the term in which the alleged grievance occurred, as outlined in section 1.
b. Notify the parties named in the statement of the receipt of a grievance naming them; send a copy of the statement to the named parties and to all Committee members; and request a written statement of response from the faculty member (respondent) named in the student’s grievance. The respondent’s statement of response shall be received within five university working days of its request and shall contain the following:

i. a brief narrative of any attempts made between the grievant and respondent to resolve the matter informally, including the names of any mediators (department chair, dean, and/or Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs) involved; and
ii. a response to the allegations made in the student’s statement of grievance.

If the grievance involves a dispute over a grade or grading procedures, then the faculty member shall also be asked to include with his/her response a copy of the syllabus for the course named in the grievance, as well as a copy of the student’s grade record for said course.

c. Notify the grievant and respondent of their rights to challenge Committee members for cause and request early notification of challenge(s) to expedite the grievance procedures. Included in this notification will be a list of the names of Committee members. Any Committee members removed for cause shall be replaced by alternate members selected as in section 2, and the newly formed committee shall meet again to render a decision as to whether sufficient grounds are present to warrant a hearing.
d. Meet within ten university working days after receiving the written statements of grievance and response to review the written statements and render a decision as to whether sufficient grounds are present to warrant a hearing.
e. Notify the grievant and the named parties of its decision in writing. In the event that the Committee determines that a hearing is not necessary, this decision is not appealable.
f. If a hearing will be held, notify in writing all parties involved, including any witnesses, of the date, time, and place of the hearing at least ten university working days prior to the hearing date set. The hearing date shall be within twenty (20) university working days of the decision to hold a hearing reached pursuant to paragraph 3 (d).
g. Inform the parties that the burden of proof rests with the grievant, and that each party may be accompanied to the hearing by a supporter. A supporter is a Bellarmine University faculty member, staff member, or student who may not participate in the hearing unless specifically addressed by the Committee. The supporter cannot be involved in or related to any person involved in the case. The supporter may not address the panel. The standard of proof will be the preponderance of the evidence, which means that the information presented as a whole demonstrates that the occurrence of the alleged behavior was more probable than not.
h. Request in writing from all parties involved any additional material deemed necessary for review by the Committee prior to the hearing, as well as the names of any witnesses requested to appear at the hearing. A written statement may be provided by a witness on behalf of any party involved in lieu of an appearance at the hearing, unless the Committee, after review of any such statement, deems an appearance at the hearing is necessary. Witnesses will not be allowed both to submit a statement and appear at the hearing unless the committee so requests. These materials, plus any additional materials either party chooses to submit, must be submitted to the Committee no later than two university working days prior to the hearing.
i. All communications among the Committee, the grievant(s), and person(s) named in the statement of grievance will be confidential. Every effort will be made by Committee members to maintain confidentiality throughout the grievance process.
j. The student has the right to review official documents in his/her grievance file.  Official documents consist of materials that would be considered “educational records” under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.

4. Hearing Process
All hearings conducted by the Academic Grievance Committee shall be conducted confidentially in the following manner:

a. The hearing shall be closed to everyone except the hearing officials (Committee members, recorder, and chief hearing officer), the grievant(s), respondent(s), supporter(s) and witnesses during the actual time of their testimony. Private
attorneys and parents may not be present at the hearing.
b. The hearing shall be a private, internal review process that is informal but thorough.
c. The grievant(s) and respondent(s) must be present during the information gathering portion of the hearing. Witnesses will be available and called when needed. The Committee reserves the right to allow the presence of a secretary or technical assistant. If a respondent refuses to appear at the hearing, the hearing will be held in his or her absence.
d. Any Committee member may question any of the participants at the hearing at any time during the proceedings.
e. The grievant will present his/her statements and/or witnesses to the Committee.
f. The respondent will present his/her statement and/or witnesses to the Committee.
g. The grievant and the respondent will have the opportunity to question the grievant(s) and respondent (s) and witnesses about their statements.
h. After all information is exchanged, all persons, other than the Committee members and the recording secretary, will leave the room. The grievant(s), respondent(s), and witnesses will continue to be available to the Committee should further information be requested.
i. The Committee will meet in closed session to decide upon its recommendation(s) to the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs (AVPAA) or his/her designee.
j. The Committee shall submit its report with recommendation(s) to the AVPAA. If the grievance directly involves the AVPAA, the report and recommendation(s) of the Academic Grievance Committee shall be referred to the Vice President for Academic Affairs (VPAA) or his/her designee.
k. The student’s grievance will not be included as part of the student’s record, unless it results in a change in student status or the student voluntarily inserts the information.

5. Decision
In the event a hearing is held and an appeal taken, the AVPAA or his/her designee shall approve or reject the Committee’s recommendation(s) within ten (10) working days after it is received, unless he or she feels that more information is necessary, in which case the AVPAA may resubmit the case to the Committee for further findings prior to the decision. If the decision of the AVPAA is not in accord with the Committee’s recommendation(s), he/she shall state the reasons for that decision, in writing, to all persons directly involved in the grievance and to the Committee Chairperson (or Vice-Chairperson, as appropriate). The AVPAA shall then take appropriate action to implement his/her decision.

6. Appeal
The Vice President for Academic Affairs (VPAA) or his/her designee, within twenty-one (21) days after the AVPAA’s decision, may
be petitioned by the grievant(s) or respondent(s) to reconsider the decision based only upon evidence clearly not available at the original hearing. Such an appeal is discretionary.

Grading Policies

Grading System

Bellarmine University uses a 4.00 scale for grading. The Grade Point Average (GPA) is a calculated by dividing the sum of quality points by the sum of quality hours as shown on the transcript. Quality points are assigned to letter grades as follows:

A+ 4.00 quality points per quality hour For truly exceptional work; to be awarded rarely
A 4.00 quality points per quality hour Excellent
A- 3.67 quality points per quality hour  
B+ 3.33 quality points per quality hour  
B 3.00 quality points per quality hour Good
B- 2.67 quality points per quality hour  
C+ 2.33 quality points per quality hour  
C 2.00 quality points per quality hour Average
C- 1.67 quality points per quality hour  
D+ 1.33 quality points per quality hour  
D 1.00 quality points per quality hour Passing
D- 0.67 quality points per quality hour  
F 0.00 quality points per quality hour Failing
P Pass Pass, hours earned only
I 0.00 quality points per quality hour Incomplete
W 0.00 quality points per quality hour Withdraw
WX 0.00 quality points per quality hour Administrative Withdrawal
AU 0.00 quality points per quality hour Audit

Incomplete Grades

An Incomplete ("I") grade may be granted, at the discretion of the course instructor, if there is verification of illness, death in the family, or some other extenuating circumstance that has prohibited the student from completing the course work and/or taking the final exam.

Students requesting an Incomplete must obtain approval from the course instructor using an Incomplete Contract Form, available on the Registrar's Office website.  Completed forms must be submitted to the Registrar's Office by the grading deadline for the semester in which the Incomplete is requested.

A grade of Incomplete must be completed within the semester following the Incomplete (excluding summer semester unless the student's program requires summer enrollment).  Instructors have the option to require an earlier deadline, which they will indicate on the Incomplete Contract Form.  Failure to complete the course by the deadline will automatically result in a grade of “F.” The responsibility for course completion rests solely with the student.

Pass/Fail Option

The Pass/Fail policy encourages students to enrich their liberal arts experience by enabling them to take one course per semester on a Pass/Fail basis. Students may use this option to explore subjects outside their primary areas. For example, students may take courses primarily for personal enrichment in areas to which they were introduced through the General Education Requirements or take courses to expand their general knowledge in professionally related areas.

The Pass/Fail option is open only to juniors and seniors.

Students may take only one course per semester on a Pass/Fail basis. The total number of courses a student may take on a Pass/Fail basis may not exceed four.  This limit does not include internships, practica, field-based, or other courses that are pre-designated as Pass/Fail courses.

Some courses may not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.  These include, courses used to satisfy General Education Requirements, courses in the department of the student’s major or minor, and courses designated as required related courses for the student’s major or minor.

To receive a Pass grade, a student must earn the equivalent of a C or better for the course.  No quality points are assigned to a Pass grade, which is entered on the student’s record as earned hours only.  A student whose performance in the course falls below the level of a C will receive a grade of "F".  Students registered for a course on a Pass/Fail basis may change to A-F grade status and vice versa by the deadline published in the semester Class Schedule.  A change from Pass/Fail to grade or from grade to Pass/Fail requires the approval of the instructor.

Repeat Policy

A student is permitted to repeat a course in which a C+ grade or lower has been earned. In deciding to exercise the repeat option, the student agrees to accept for record the grade earned for the course as repeated. The earlier grade and quality points will remain on the transcript for the term in which it was received, but will not be used in computing the student’s cumulative grade point average and cumulative earned hours. The student will receive the grade and quality points of the repeat, which will be used in determining the grade point average and the number of hours earned. Note: Students whose program requires a grade higher than C+ should request an exception to the repeat policy by following the Waiver and Exception Policy outlined in the catalog.

Class Attendance

Each student is expected to attend all classes for which he/she is enrolled. The attendance policy for each course is determined by the instructor of each course and can be found in the course syllabus. This policy is made known to the class at the beginning of each semester. It is the student’s responsibility to know the policy on attendance for each course in which he/she is enrolled.

It is the responsibility of students to attend every class session held when they are not ill, involved with a personal emergency, or traveling with approved athletic events, academic activities, or while representing Bellarmine in other approved capacities. Consistent class attendance and participation are essential to academic success. Poor class attendance is a major factor in nearly all cases of academic failure.

Absences Due to Illness - Students should contact their instructors at the earliest opportunity, preferably prior to the class meeting (especially if any graded work is scheduled).

Absences Due to Emergencies - Students should notify the Student Affairs Office at 502.452.8150 if they must leave the University for any extended period of time because of hospitalization, injuries, or family problems. Instructors will be contacted, but it is the responsibility of the student to arrange for any make-up work. The instructor in each course is responsible for arranging for the administration of any deferred examination.

Absences while representing Bellarmine University - Students should complete an Absentee Notification Form for each class session that will be missed due to athletic events, academic activities, or while representing Bellarmine in other approved capacities. The signed Student Absentee Notification Form confirms that you are participating in a University-sponsored event or activity. It does not serve as an excused absence from that class. Your instructor has the final say in excused and unexcused absences, and it is the student’s responsibility to know and abide by each instructor’s policy.

Every effort must be made to discuss with the course instructor any activities or events that have been previously scheduled and result in conflicts with the course schedule. Examples of such activities include, but are not limited to, athletic competitions, clinical or field experiences and school-related conferences. 

These discussions must occur within the first week of any course, prior to the drop deadline, and a written schedule must be provided to the instructor at that time. In addition, and in the event that prior scheduling is not possible, the signed Student Absentee Notification Form must be provided to the instructor at the earliest possible opportunity, but not later than the week prior to the anticipated absence.

A student who is inexcusably absent from class on a day on which a previously announced test or examination is given will receive the grade of “F.” In case of an excused absence on such a day, he/she will consult with his/her instructor as to what arrangements are to be made for making up the missed work. In all cases, students are expected to follow the policies outlined by the instructor in
the course syllabus.
 

Withdrawal Policies

A student who finds it necessary to drop a course(s) or withdraw from the University after registration must provide written notification to the Office of the Registrar.  The effective date of withdrawal is the date on which the notification is received in the Registrar’s Office. This date is used in calculating any applicable tuition reduction/refund.

Withdrawal from a Course

Students may drop a course during the first week of classes (fall and spring) with no entry on their official transcript. The drop deadline for summer courses are published in the academic calendar.  To drop a course, a completed drop form must be submitted to the Registrar's Office.  No signatures are required on the drop form.

From the second through approximately the tenth week of classes (or two-thirds of the semester for classes not offered on a regular semester basis), students may withdraw from a course with a grade of W on the transcript. Withdraw slips are available in the Registrar's Office and require the signature of the course instructor.  Students may not withdraw  from a course after the withdrawal deadline published in the semester's academic calendar except for documented reasons of serious illness or family or financial problems. To withdraw after the deadline, students must follow the Waiver/Exceptions Policy outlined in the catalog.

Withdrawal from the Semester

To withdraw from all courses in the semester, students must complete a Withdraw Form found on the Registrar's Office website (individual withdrawal slips should not be submitted).  All full-time undergraduate students are required to meet with, and obtain the signature of, a representative of the Academic Resource Center (ARC) prior to withdrawing.  Students who fail to comply with this policy will receive an F for all courses for which they are registered and will be responsible for corresponding tuition and fees.  Students may not withdraw from the semester after the withdrawal deadline published in the semester's academic calendar except for documented reasons of serious illness or family or financial problems. To withdraw after the deadline, students must follow the Waiver/Exceptions Policy outlined in the catalog.

Institutional Financial Aid Refund Policy

When a student has Institutional financial aid from Bellarmine University and completely withdraws during the time that a tuition refund is due, the student is eligible to keep the same percentage of Institutional financial aid that they are charged for tuition. The remaining aid is refunded to the financial aid programs.

Treatment of Federal Title IV Aid After Withdrawal

The law specifies how Bellarmine University must determine the amount of Federal Title IV program assistance that you earn if you withdraw from school. The Title IV programs that are covered by this law are Federal Pell Grants, Federal Direct Stafford Loans, Direct PLUS Loans, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs), Federal Perkins Loans, and TEACH Grants. When you withdraw during the semester the amount of Title IV program assistance that you have earned up to that point is determined by a specific formula. If you received (or Bellarmine or your parent received on your behalf) less assistance than
the amount that you earned, you may be able to receive those additional funds. If you receive more assistance than you earned, the excess funds must be returned by Bellarmine and/or you.

The amount of assistance that you have earned is determined on a prorata basis. For example, if you completed 30 percent of your semester, you earn 30 percent of the assistance you were originally scheduled to receive. Once you have completed more than 60 percent of the semester, you earn all of the assistance that you were scheduled to receive for that semester. If you did not receive funds that you earned, you may be due a post-withdrawal disbursement. If the post-withdrawal disbursement includes loan funds, Bellarmine must get your permission before it can disburse them. You may choose to decline some or all of your loan funds, you have fourteen days to choose to decline the additional loan funds so that you don’t incur additional debt. Bellarmine will automatically use all or a portion of your post-withdrawal disbursement (including loan funds if you accept them) for tuition, fees, and room and board charges.  Bellarmine needs your permission to use the post-withdrawal disbursement for all other school charges. If you do not give your permission, you will be offered the funds. However, it may be in your best interest to allow Bellarmine to keep the funds to reduce your debt.

There are some Title IV funds that you were scheduled to receive that cannot be dispersed to you once you withdraw because of other eligibility requirements. For example, if you are a first time, first year undergraduate student and you have not completed the first 30 days of your program before you withdraw, you will not earn any Federal Stafford or Federal Plus loan funds that you would have received had you remained enrolled past the 30th day.

If you receive (or Bellarmine or your parent receives on your behalf) excess Title IV program funds that must be returned, Bellarmine must return a portion of the excess equal to the lesser of: 1. Your institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of your funds; or 2. The entire amount of excess funds. Bellarmine must return this amount even if it did not keep this amount of your Title IV funds.

If Bellarmine is not required to return all of the excess funds, you must return the remaining amount. Any loan funds that you must return, you (or your parent for a PLUS Loan) repay in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. That is you make scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time. Any amount of unearned grant funds that you must return is called an overpayment. The amount of a grant overpayment that you must repay is half of the grant funds you received or were scheduled to receive. Bellarmine will return the unearned grant funds for you, which may cause you to owe a balance.

The requirements for Title IV program funds when you withdraw are separate from any refund policy that Bellarmine has. Therefore, you may still owe funds to Bellarmine to cover unpaid institutional charges.  Bellarmine may also charge you for any Title IV program funds that Bellarmine was required to return. If you don’t already know what Bellarmine’s refund policy is, see the previous section or, you can ask for a copy in the Office of the Registrar. Bellarmine can also provide you with the requirements and procedures for officially withdrawing from school.

If you have questions about your Title IV program funds, you can call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1.800.4.FED.AID. TTY users may call 1.800.730.8913. Information is also available on “Student Aid on the Web” at www.studentaid.ed.gov. The Office of Financial Aid and the Bursar at Bellarmine are also available to assist you.

Final Examinations

Students are required to take final examinations in each course at the time and date printed in the official semester Class Schedule. In some cases procedures other than final examinations may be used for student evaluation. Such substitute procedures, noted on the course syllabus, require approval of the department chair and dean. There are occasions when the time and date of a final examination may be changed according to the following policy:

  1. No student shall be required to take more than two legitimately scheduled final examinations in one day. A student having three legitimately scheduled final examinations on one day may request adjustment of his or her exam schedule by following the procedures published each semester in the Class Schedule. For information and assistance, contact the Registrar.
  2. In a circumstance other than that of three or more examinations scheduled in one day (with the agreement of the instructor, and for reasons of a serious nature supported by evidence) a student may request postponement of an examination. A postponed examination must be taken prior to the published date for submission of grades.
  3. Any single or group final examination given earlier than the scheduled date and time for the respective semester requires the written approval of the department chair and dean.

Dean’s List

To acknowledge publicly the high scholastic achievement of its degree-seeking students, Bellarmine follows the traditional practice of publishing a Dean’s List at the end of each semester. Placement on this list is merited by a full-time student with a semester GPA of 3.50. Part-time students qualify provided they have completed 15 semester hours with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 and, in the semester of eligibility, have earned a GPA of 3.50 for no less than two courses and six semester hours. Students doing student teaching are eligible for the Dean’s List if they have a 3.50 in courses for that one semester and if they have been on the Dean’s List for the two previous semesters.

Classification of Students

Full-time/Part-time

A student is considered full-time if enrolled for 12 or more semester hours. A student enrolled for fewer than 12 hours is considered a part-time student. For the financial aid definition of part-time and full-time, see that section of the catalog.

Class Standing

A student's class standing is defined by the total number of semester credits earned (credits in-progress do not count toward this calculation).

  • Freshman standing: until completion of 30 earned hours
  • Sophomore standing: completion of 30 to 59.99 earned hours
  • Junior standing: completion of 60 to 89.99 earned hours
  • Seniorstanding: 90 or more earned hours

Maximum Course Load

Full-time undergraduate students must register for at least 12 hours of academic work a semester. The maximum credit-hour limit for undergraduate students is 19 hours per semester. Additional credits beyond 19 require the approval of the department chair and dean and are charged at the per-credit hour rate.

Academic Status

A student's academic status is determined by the grade point average (GPA) achieved, both on a semester and cumulative basis.  GPA is calculated by dividing the sum of quality points by the sum of quality hours. To be eligible for graduation, a student must have a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher.

Good Standing

The status of good standing indicates that a student has a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or better and that s/he is making satisfactory progress toward a degree. Refer to the Student Handbook regarding non-academic good standing.

Academic Probation and Dismissal Based on GPA

Academic Probation

A student will be placed on probation for any of the following reasons:     

  • Cumulative GPA falls below 2.00
  • Semester GPA falls below 1.60     
  • Assigned two “F’s” in any semester.

A student will continue on academic probation until he or she raises the cumulative GPA to 2.00.  Probation is not noted on the official academic transcript.

Academic Dismissal

A student whose cumulative GPA falls below the following scale will be dismissed for poor scholarship at the end of:

  • 2 semesters—1.40
  • 3 semesters—1.50
  • 4 semesters—1.60
  • 5 semesters—1.80
  • 6 semesters or more—2.00

Academic dismissal is recorded on the offical academic transcript.  All appeals of academic dismissal should be made to the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Readmission After Academic Dismissal

A student dismissed a first time for poor scholarship may, after a lapse of one complete semester (fall or spring), apply for readmission.  A student dismissed a second time for poor scholarship may, after a lapse of two years, apply for readmission.  Applications should be submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Admission.  If the application is approved, the student is readmitted on probation and must comply with the stipulations made by the Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs. Within a reasonable period of time, which may be specified by the AVPAA, the student must attain the cumulative GPA outlined in the Academic Dismissal Policy above.

Independent Study and Contract Courses

Independent Study

An Independent Study is a self-designed research project or course in a topic of the students’ choice. Students work independently under the guidance of a faculty supervisor who will grade the student upon completion.  Independent studies are graded on the A-F system.   A student may take up to six credit hours in independent study and contract courses combined; no more than three hours may be taken during any one semester.  Independent study registration forms are available in the Registrar's Office.

Contract Course Option

The Contract Course option is for students to complete an existing catalog course independently with the instructor (a one-on-one format instead of the traditional classroom setting). Contract courses are graded on the A-F system.  A student may take up to six credit hours in independent study and contract courses combined; no more than three hours may be taken during any one semester.  Contract Course registration forms are available in the Registrar's Office.

Internships

Internships for credit or not for credit are available in many majors and programs. Placements are made in a variety of businesses, institutions, agencies, and organizations. Information on internships is available from the department chairs or the Career Center.  Internship registration forms are available in the Office of the Registrar.

A student may enroll for a maximum of 12 hours of academic credit in departmental internships. Only six (6) of these hours may be in the student’s major. The remaining six (6) hours must be in another academic discipline – either a student’s second major or an academic discipline outside the student’s major. Each registered internship for academic credit must be a different experience from previous internships.  Students must registrer for the Internship during the semster in which the work hours are carried out. 

Kentuckiana Metroversity

Bellarmine University is a member of the Kentuckiana Metroversity, a consortium of colleges and universities in Kentucky and southern Indiana. Bellarmine students may enroll in the Metroversity under the following conditions:

  1. Metroversity students may take a maximum of two courses per semester at the other, participating institutions provided the combined total of the work at Bellarmine and the other college constitutes full-time status.
  2. These courses will be treated as part of the student’s normal load at his/her home institution and tuition is paid accordingly. Specific course fees declared by the host institution are paid by the student.
  3. The maximum number of credit hours to be taken as a Metroversity student will be determined by the home institution.
  4. Students who wish to take courses under this program must obtain the Metroversity form from the Office of the Registrar and follow the procedure as directed. Bellarmine reserves the right to determine acceptability for credit of courses taken at other institutions.

Registration for courses at other institutions in the Kentuckiana Metroversity consortium is not usually permitted as substitution for courses offered and required at Bellarmine. The opportunity for registration in Metroversity courses exists to enlarge the student’s curriculum selection under free electives, or to enhance a student’s major when related study is not available at Bellarmine. General Education course requirements and major course requirements for a degree at Bellarmine may not be satisfied through Kentuckiana Metroversity registration unless:

  1. The student can demonstrate a bona fide schedule conflict at Bellarmine University;
  2. The student’s progress for degree is unreasonably delayed due to Bellarmine’s course schedule; or
  3. By petition of the student, specific approval for the substitution has been approved through the Dean.

Metroversity registration for the substitution of university courses required in General Education or the major (when requested for bona fide reasons of conflict in schedule or unreasonable delay of progress for degree) requires only the approval of the Office of the Registrar with the recommendation of the appropriate department chair.

Metroversity students are not allowed to participate in Bellarmine co-curricular programs and activities (Mock trial, special service trips, discipline-specific clubs, etc.), even when they are associated with courses in which students are allowed to enroll. Metroversity students may not enroll in Honors Program and Brown Scholars Program classes, nor earn internship credit through Bellarmine.

Metroversity registration for music courses at Bellarmine University is restricted to those courses that do not entail private lessons or small-group instruction. If Metroversity students wish to enroll in a course that involves private lessons, they may register only as Visiting Students and must pay regular tuition and fees. The $25.00 application fee is waived. 

Study at Other Institutions

Bellarmine students who wish to take courses at another accredited institution and transfer the credit to Bellarmine University must obtain a Visiting Student Letter from the Office of the Registrar. Only students in academic good standing – those possessing a cumulative grade-point average of 2.00 or higher – are eligible to obtain a Visiting Student Letter. Students not in good standing are not permitted to take courses at other institutions for transfer back to Bellarmine. Courses taken at another college or university will not be accepted toward a degree unless a student has obtained a Visiting Student Letter. Bellarmine reserves the right to determine the acceptability for credit of courses taken at another institution. See the transfer of credit policy for more information on transferring credits.

Bellarmine considers its courses specified for General Education Requirements, undergraduate degrees, and major requirements an integral part of the Bellarmine education. Once a student, first-time college level or transfer, has been accepted by Bellarmine for study, not more than eight semester hours or two courses may be applied under “Visiting Student” arrangements to the General Education Requirements or to major or minor requirements. Specific approval for that credit transfer must be given by the appropriate department chairperson.

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree who began and have continued their studies at Bellarmine, as well as transfer students who have transferred fewer than 60 semester credit hours to Bellarmine, are restricted to 12 semester hours or four courses from another institution. Students who have transferred 60 or more semeser credit hours to Bellarmine are restricted to six hours or two courses. 

Transfer of Credit Policy

This policy applies to all coursework considered for transfer to Bellarmine. 

Bellarmine University awards transfer credit for grades “D” or higher in coursework that is considered college-level and is from regionally accredited institutions when similar in scope, content, and standards to courses offered at Bellarmine. Remedial, technical, vocational, internship, externship, and courses not consistent with the liberal arts tradition are not transferable.

Students must provide official transcripts sent directly from the other institution(s) to be reviewed for transfer of credit eligibility. Transfer of credit evaluations (TCE’s) are made on a course-by course basis by the Registrar’s Office in consultation with appropriate academic department chairs when necessary. Credits, transferred in semester hour equivalents, may be articulated as directly equivalent to a Bellarmine course or as elective credit. Upon receipt of their TCE, students may provide the Registrar’s Office with additional descriptive material if further review is desired. Transfer work becomes a part of the official Bellarmine record after a student has been fully accepted and enrolled in the university.

Credits and grades are recorded on the official Bellarmine transcript; however, transfer grades do not affect the student’s grade point average (except in the one-time calculation of graduation honors, see below). The residency requirements of the university must be satisfied regardless of the number of credits transferred.

Once a student has matriculated at Bellarmine, he or she may not take a course at another institution and transfer it back to repeat a course previously taken at Bellarmine (transfer credits do not include GPA, therefore the original grade earned cannot be replaced).

If a student who entered Bellarmine as a transfer student repeats a course at Bellarmine that was taken at a previous school, and that repeat is in accordance with Bellarmine’s Repeat Policy, the student will be awarded the Bellarmine credit in the class. The credit for the original class will be eliminated from the overall credit totals of the student.

Transfer Student Policies

The policies below apply to all students who are admitted to Bellarmine University as transfer students from other colleges or universities. The Transfer of Credit Policy above applies to any coursework transferred to Bellarmine, whether it was taken by transfer student applicants, or current Bellarmine students taking courses elsewhere during their time at Bellarmine.

Graduation Requirements for Transfer Students

Transfer students must complete all degree requirements as outlined in the Degree Requirements section of this catalog.

  1. Transfer students must satisfactorily complete in residence at Bellarmine University a minimum of 36 semester credits, including at least 12 upper-level semester credits in their degree major (12 in each major for multiple majors).
  2. The IDC 100 and 101 requirements are automatically waived for transfer students admitted to the university with more than 24 semester credits completed. See the Interdisciplinary Courses section of this catalog for more information regarding IDC waiver policies.
  3. For transfer students, the upper-level Theology requirement could be met by any course taken in an accredited department of theology or religion, even if at the lower-level (100 or 200 level or equivalent). This determination will be made by the Registrar in consultation with the Theology Department Chair.

Graduation with GPA Honors for Transfer Students

See the Graduation with Honors section of this catalog for the full Honors GPA Policy. Transfer and second degree students must have earned a minimum of 60 credits in residence at Bellarmine and possess a minimum 3.50 cumulative Bellarmine GPA to be eligible.  In addition, grades received in both the courses transferred to Bellarmine and those taken at Bellarmine will be used in the calculation of the GPA for purposes of determining graduation honors. This calculation is done manually and for this purpose only; it does not appear on the Bellarmine transcript or other official documents.

Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC)

Eligible students may enroll through the Metroversity to pursue ROTC programs. Interested students should contact the Military Science Department at the University of Louisville, 502.852.7902.

Cancellation of Classes

The Provost officially determines if classes will be cancelled due to severe weather or other circumstances. If classes are cancelled, then Bellarmine University is closed, and this decision applies to students, faculty and staff members.

The official closing message will be communicated as follows: on the Bellarmine University website; by e-mail to all students, faculty and staff members; by text message to the cell phones of all students, faculty, and staff members who have registered for the emergency text-messaging system; and on the university’s telephone system, 502.452.8000, option number 6.

The following television stations will be notified to broadcast the announcement: WHAS 11, WDRB Fox 41, WAVE 3, and WLKY 32.

Graduation Information

Review of Transcript

All students must formally apply for graduation by submitting a Graduation Application form (available in the Registrar’s Office) no later than one year in advance of the intended graduation date (one semester in advance for post baccalaureate second degree students).  This is the first step in the process to be eligible for graduation. It is the responsibility of the student to be aware of the application process and deadlines. The University does not assume to know the student's intended graduation date and will not automatically complete a student's degree without a Graduation Application form on file.

The submission of a Graduation Application form generates a degree audit (review of your academic transcript by the Registrar), which will be sent to you and your advisor via email.  Visit the Graduation link on the Registrar's Office website for complete procedures on how to apply for graduation.

Graduation Fee

A fee of $75 is charged to undergraduate students in the final semester once a Graduation Application form has been submitted to the Registrar's Office.  The fee is charged whether or not the student chooses to participate in the commencement ceremony.

Participation in the Commencement Ceremony

To be eligible to participate in the commencement ceremony, a student must complete all degree requirements by the end of the semester in which they are graduating.  Graduation ceremonies are held in December and May.  The December ceremony is for graduates from the prior summer as well as fall semester graduates.

Approximately two months prior to commencement, students are sent an Intent to Walk form; completion of this form is required to RSVP for the ceremony.

Graduation with GPA Honors

GPA Honors are based on a student’s cumulative GPA. Honors will be granted at graduation and indicated on the student’s permanent record and diploma in keeping with the following scale of academic achievement:

  1. Cum laude, for a cumulative GPA of 3.50 to 3.69
  2. Magna cum laude, for a cumulative GPA of 3.70 to 3.84
  3. Summa cum laude, for a cumulative GPA of 3.85 to 4.00

Transfer and Second Degree Students:
A transfer or accelerated second degree student must have earned a minimum of 60 semester hours at Bellarmine and meet the current standards regarding honors (Bellarmine GPA of 3.50 or better) in order to be a candidate for graduation with honors at commencement.  For this population, grades received both in courses transferred to Bellarmine and in courses completed at Bellarmine will be used in determining the student’s GPA for the recognition of honors.

Academic Awards for Graduating Seniors

Each year at spring commencement, the university confers two awards for outstanding intellectual achievement. The Wilson Wyatt Fellowship of Academic Excellence recognizes a graduating senior’s sustained intellectual distinction; the recipient is selected through a rigorous process, which includes an essay competition and interviews with faculty and trustees. The Archbishop’s Medal for Scholastic Excellence is awarded to the graduating senior with the highest cumulative grade point average. The Archbishop’s Medal is also awarded at the Fall Commencement.

Credit Options

Students may pursue opportunities for earning academic credit based on prior learning experiences by taking advantage of the following credit options. For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar.

External Examinations

A maximum of 30 semester credits may be gained through the external and internal credit options described below.

Advanced Placement (AP) Credit

Bellarmine offers academic credit, placement, or both to students who earn scores of 4 or 5 (a few departments accept scores of 3) on the Advanced Placement tests sponsored by The College Board. For a complete listing of how credits transfer, see www.bellarmine.edu/registrar.

International Baccalaureate (IB) Credit

Bellarmine offers academic credit, and some placement to students who earn scores of 5, 6, or 7 on the International Baccalaureate exams. Some exams are only accepted at the Higher Level. For a complete listing of how credits will transfer, see www.bellarmine.edu/registrar.

CLEP Exams

Bellarmine offers academic credit and placement for some CLEP exams. For a complete listing of how CLEP credits will transfer, see www.bellarmine.edu/registrar. For information on the CLEP exams administered at the University of Louisville Testing Center, call 502.852.6606.

Other External Exams

Credit, and or placement may be available for other types of external examinations. Official transcripts must be sent to the Office of the Registrar where credit determinations will be made in consultation with appropriate academic departments.

Internal Options

A maximum of 30 semester credits may be gained through the external (above) and internal credit options described below.

Credit for Demonstrated Competency (Challenge Exam)

Enrolled Bellarmine students may petition the department chair to take a comprehensive examination on the material covered in any credit course offered by that department. A grade for this exam is strictly on a Pass/Fail basis. A non-refundable $50 fee is charged at the point of application. A fee, equal to one credit hour tuition, is charged for each course after the exam has been evaluated. Forms are available in the Registrar’s office.

Portfolio

Up to twelve undergraduate credits and six graduate credits may be gained in this category. Bellarmine University recognizes the value of life and work achievement by awarding academic credit for knowledge gained through experience. A detailed explanation and documentation of the learning acquired outside the academic classroom are presented in portfolio format for evaluation by Bellarmine faculty. Successful completion of a portfolio results in a “pass” grade. A fee equal to one credit hour of tuition is charged for each course equivalent after a portfolio has been evaluated. A non-refundable $70.00 fee is charged at the point of portfolio application. 

Study, Service, Internship and Work Opportunities Abroad

www.bellarmine.edu/international/studya/

International Programs Office - Miles Hall, Suite 149

Gabriele W. Bosley, MA, MAT, Director, International Programs; Professor, Global Languages and Cultures
Miles Hall 148, Phone 502.272.8476, gbosley@bellarmine.edu  

Sara Reyna-Byler, IPO Assistant
Miles Hall 146, 502.272.8479, sreynabyler@bellarmine.edu  

Erica Ward, Study Abroad Advisor
Miles Hall 147, Phone 502.272.8423, eward@bellarmine.edu

Bellarmine University views study abroad as an ideal venue in support of its mission to help Bellarmine students gain understanding, acquire knowledge, and develop skills for living in a globally interdependent and culturally diverse world. The university seeks to ensure that study abroad is available as an integral component not only for foreign language study but for all other academic areas as well, and that it is accessible to all students, regardless of social and economic background. Bellarmine offers a wide variety of study abroad options, ranging from departmental programs to summer enclave programs and semester or academic year exchanges. General information sessions on study abroad are offered during all college orientation sessions, weekly information sessions, as well as toward the middle of the fall semester at the Study Abroad Fair. Unless otherwise noted, for more information on the study abroad opportunities listed below, contact Professor Bosley or Erica Ward.

Academic Year Programs

One- and two-semester study abroad opportunities during the academic year are available to Bellarmine students through the following programs, bilateral exchange partnerships as well as ISEP (International Student Exchange Program):

International Student Exchange Program (ISEP): In 1993, Bellarmine University joined the International Student Exchange Program, a consortium of more than 200 universities and colleges around the globe. Through the institution’s membership in ISEP, a Bellarmine student has the opportunity to study at any of the affiliated universities with credit transferred back to Bellarmine. For students without foreign language proficiency, study is available at English-speaking universities in Australia, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The cost of a semester or academic year abroad is basically the same as a semester spent on the Bellarmine campus, plus the cost of the airline ticket and approximately $500.00 in ISEP placement/ administrative fees. Scholarships are available on a competitive basis for study at most sites. Brochures are available in October in the International Programs Office. See also www.isep.org.

AFRICA

Morocco

Al Akhawayn University, Morocco: Through a 2007 bilateral agreement Bellarmine students may study at this excellent institution in North Africa. Al Akhawayn University (AUI) is located in Ifrane, Morocco. AUI is modeled on the American university system and English is the language of instruction. AUI does, however, give special attention to the teaching of the Arabic language at all levels and in all branches of education. AUI is a small institution and the student faculty ratio is 17-1. AUI contributes to the historical and cultural vocation of the Kingdom of Morocco, an Arab-African nation belonging to Islamic civilization, and open to Europe, America and Asia. AUI aims to train graduates with high academic qualifications, in permanent quest of knowledge and culture, aware of their social obligations and imbued with the values of human solidarity and tolerance. For more information contact the International Programs Office or visit www.aui.ma.

South Africa

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University:Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU) is located in Port Elizabeth, South Africa along Nelson Mandela Bay, “The Watersport Capital of Africa,” on the Eastern Cape. With over 500 study programs, NMMU offers many study choices to its students. The university is the most diverse university in South Africa and offers many social and cultural activities in which students take part, such as clubs, societies, sports and volunteer opportunities. Through a 2011 bilateral agreement, Bellarmine students can become part of this university studying in a wide range of fields such as arts and sciences, communication, education, health sciences, business, and social sciences. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.nmmu.ac.za.

Rhodes University, South Africa: As a result of a 2007 bilateral agreement, Bellarmine students now have the opportunity to study at an excellent institution in South Africa. Rhodes University is located in the heart of South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province and owes its unique character to a combination of historical, geographical, cultural and architectural factors. Small in size but substantial in their impact, the achievements of successive generations of Rhodians have had an influence on Southern Africa and beyond. The University’s social consciousness is expressed in its commitment to sharing knowledge resources with the community of Grahamstown and in encouraging an ethos of community service within its staff and student body. In addition to their commitment to social justice issues, Rhodes has many excellent academic departments including a world-class music department. For more information contact the International Programs Office or visit www.ru.ac.za.

ASIA

China

The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China: Through a 2005 bilateral exchange agreement with the Chinese University of Hong Kong, (CUHK) one of the top 50 institutions in the world. Bellarmine students can study at one of the finest bilingual (Chinese and English) institutions in China. At CUHK Bellarmine Students can experience the unique blend of western and Chinese cultures. CUHK offers courses in English in the following disciplines: art, business administration, engineering, science and social sciences. The Chinese University of Hong Kong was established in 1963 as Hong Kong’s second university. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.cuhk.edu.hk/oal.

Lingnan University, Hong Kong, China:Lingnan University, located in Hong Kong, is a liberal arts institution founded in 1888. Through a bilateral agreement in 2011, Bellarmine students can study at Lingnan University in the arts, humanities, social sciences and business (AASCB accredited). There are many opportunities for Bellarmine students to become involved while at Lingnan, through campus life and community service opportunities. Like Bellarmine, Lingnan has a small student-to-faculty ratio which allows more classroom discussion. Bellarmine graduates also have an opportunity to apply for the Visiting Tutor Program(http://www.ln.edu.hk/ceal/visit-tutor2011.php) which focuses on English language teaching through the university’s Centre for English and Additional Languages. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.ln.edu.hk.

Nanjing University, Nanjing, China:Nanjing University, founded in 1902, has three campuses: Gulou, Pukou, and Xianlin.  Located only 3 ½ hours from Shanghai by car, Nanjing lies along the Yangzi River. With over 12,000 undergraduate students and 59 departments, there is a lot of variety to be experienced at Nanjing. Through a 2011 bilateral agreement, Bellarmine students can study in various fields in Chinese (business, science, humanities, and social sciences) as well as some classes in English and Chinese language classes. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visitwww.nju.edu.cn/cps/site/njueweb/fg/index.php.

Xiamen University, China: TBA 2011  

Taiwan

National University of Taiwan: TBA 2010

Japan

Kansai Gaidai University, Osaka, Japan: Through a 1994 bilateral exchange agreement with Kansai Gaidai University near Osaka, Japan, Bellarmine students have an opportunity to live either on campus or with a Japanese family for one or two semesters while furthering their Japanese language proficiency and pursuing content studies taught in English on Asian history, culture, religion, politics, business, management, marketing, international law, Asian thought, theatre, studio art, and more. Students are encouraged to have studied one or two semesters of Japanese before applying to this program. The cost will be about the same as studying a semester in residence at Bellarmine University. Scholarships of up to $10,000 are available through the Japanese government on a competitive basis. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.kansaigaidai.ac.jp/asp.

Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Japan: Study at YNU is accessible to Bellarmine students through a 2001 bilateral exchange agreement between BU and YNU and conducted in both English and Japanese in a variety of academic areas. YNU was founded in 1949 and consists of four undergraduate schools (Education and Human Services, Economics, Business Administration, Engineering,) and three graduate schools (Education, Engineering Social Sciences), serving over 10,000 students in the port city of Yokohama, Japan’s largest international trading city. Scholarships of up to $10,000 are available to Bellarmine students for study at YNU. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit: www.ynu.ac.jp.

South Korea

Ewha Womens University, Seoul, South Korea:Ewha Womens University, founded in 1886, has a beautiful campus located in Seoul, South Korea. Through a 2011 bilateral agreement, both male and female Bellarmine students can study at Ewha in many subjects in the arts and sciences, business (AASCB accredited), communication, education, health sciences, and social sciences. With the opportunity to study Korean culture, students can immerse themselves in the local culture at Ewha and South Korea. Each international student has a local student as a buddy to help them adjust to their new life in South Korea. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.ewha.ac.kr/english/.

Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea: TBA 2011

Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea: TBA 2011

Turkey

Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey: TBA 2011

EUROPE

Austria

Karl-Franzes Universität, Graz, Austria: Through a 2003 bilateral exchange agreement with Karl- Franzens Universität in Graz, Austria, Bellarmine students have access to the second largest university in Austria. The total enrollment is 23,000. The university offers more than 20 programs of study. Intensive German classes are offered at the beginning of each semester. Graz was originally founded in 1585 by the Habsburg Archduke Karl II. Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz was re-installed by the Habsburg Emperor Franz I in 1837, resulting in the university bearing both the Habsburg leaders’ names. Graz, the second largest city in Austria, is located in the southeastern province of Syria, called the “green heart of Austria” because of its extensive forests. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.kfunigraz.ac.at.

The University of Kufstein Tirol, Kufstein, Austria: Through a 2004 bilateral exchange agreement with FHS Kufstein Tirol University, Bellarmine students can study at one of the top business schools in Austria, for a semester or a full academic year. Students can take classes in English or in German depending on their level of proficiency. During their studies, the students are trained to apply their knowledge in intensive practical courses as well as during internships to help prepare for the high demands of the job market. Intellectual mobility and intercultural understanding are very important at this institution. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.fh-kufstein.ac.at.

England

Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, England: Through a 2005 bilateral exchange agreement with Leeds Metropolitan University, Bellarmine students can experience a university acclaimed worldwide for the quality of its teaching and research. One of the largest universities in the UK, its size and international reputation enables the university to offer one of the widest ranges of academic courses in the UK. LMU, founded in 1824, is located in the city of Leeds approximately 2 hours from London by train. Leeds is a prosperous, commercial, industrial, and manufacturing city. It is also considered the cultural and sporting center for much of the region and one of Louisville’s sister cities. The city of Leeds has 700,000 inhabitants; LMU has over 41,000 students. For more information, visit the International Programs Office or visit www.lmu.ac.uk/index.htm.

University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England: TBA 2011: University of Birmingham has a long tradition of innovation, founded in 1900 as England’s first civic university, where students of all religions and backgrounds were accepted on an equal basis. Bellarmine students can become a part of a top-notch English institution, studying in various fields of studies including the arts and sciences, humanities, social sciences, health sciences, business, and education. The University of Birmingham takes great pride in its students whom can take part in sports and social events. Several museums and shops are located on campus as well. For more information, contact the IPO or visit http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/index.aspx.

Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, England: TBA 2011

University of Leicester, Leicester, England: TBA 2011

Finland

University of Helsinki, Finland: The University of Helsinki (UH) is Bellarmine’s first bilateral partner in Scandinavia. Through a 2007 bilateral agreement with the UH, Bellarmine students have an opportunity to study at a prestigious institution in the capital of Finland. The University of Helsinki is the oldest and largest university in Finland and celebrated its 350th anniversary in 1990. Its students make up a quarter of all university students in the country. UH encourages multidisciplinary studies across faculty and university boundaries. Since this institution has a large international student population, there is an extensive amount of course offerings in English in most disciplines. The main university area is located in the beautiful neo-classical center of Helsinki. With its large population, the University of Helsinki is able to sustain a rich variety of cultural activities. For more information contact the International Programs Office or visit www.helsinki.fi/university.

France

Université Paul Valery, Montpellier, France: Through a 1999 bilateral exchange agreement with the Université Paul Valery in Louisville’s sister city, Montpellier, a Bellarmine student can study at Montpellier III under the ISEP exchange, as well as under our bilateral agreement. The student may also qualify for an internship at Montpellier City Hall or area businesses arranged with the assistance of the Montpellier Mayor’s office during or upon completion of studies at the University of Montepellier. Tuition, room and board is basically the same as study on the Bellarmine campus. Scholarships are available through The International Programs Office. Check with the IPO for details. See also www.univ-montp3.fr.

MICEFA and the Universités de Paris, France: Through a 2002 bilateral exchange agreement between Bellarmine University and MICEFA (a group of 14 Parisian Universities including the prestigious Sorbonne), Bellarmine students can study at some of the finest French Institutions. Each exchange student can select an individualized study program with the counseling of MICEFA’s faculty members, as well as the Offices of International Programs of each participating Paris University. Students can benefit from the most adequate offerings in their field, given their fluency in French, degree of specialization and requirements. A three-week orientation and intensive French language course is offered to American students. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.micefa.org.

Université de Strasbourg, France: Through a 2005 bilateral exchange agreement with EM Strasbourg, Bellarmine students can study in French or in English in Strasbourg, located on the border between France and Germany. This is a culturally rich city that is strategically important in regards to international politics and the international marketplace. EM offers an excellent French and European Management Program. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in internships in numerous international businesses and organizations as part of this exchange. A wide range of business classes are offered in English, therefore, proficiency in a foreign language is not required for this particular program. For more information, contact the International Programs office or visit www.em-strasbourg.eu.

Germany

Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Germany: Through a 1995 bilateral exchange agreement with Eberhard-Karls-Universität (founded 1477), Bellarmine students have the opportunity to study at one of Germany’s most renowned universities which counts among its alumni and professors some of the greatest German philosophers, theologians, poets, writers, and scientists, including Nobel laureates. Credits earned at the University of Tübingen are transferred to Bellarmine University. Tuition room and board is basically the same cost as study on the Bellarmine campus. Scholarships are available through the International Programs Office. Check with IPO for details. See also www.uni-tuebingen.de.

Ireland

National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland: Through a 2004 partnership with Willamette University, Bellarmine students have the opportunity to study each spring semester at the National University of Ireland, Galway, together with a group of Willamette students. The University was founded in 1845 as Queen’s College Galway on the banks of the river Corrib in western Ireland. Its total student enrollment is about 13,000, with academically strong programs of teaching and research throughout its seven divisions: Arts, Science, Commerce, Engineering, Celtic Studies, Medicine & Health Sciences, and Law. NUI Galway is a vibrant dynamic institution, committed to expanding and deepening its international links. This is a Study Abroad Program offered only in the spring semester. The costs are slightly different than for exchange programs. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.ucg.ie.

Italy

Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Italy: In 2006 Bellarmine signed a bilateral agreement with the Università Cattolica. Founded in 1921 by Father Agostino Gemelli, it is one of the most comprehensive and complete higher education institutions in Italy. It is located in the historic city of Milan in the central Po valley, which is Italy’s richest, most populated and most economically active region. During its 2,000 year history, it has been a driving force for great social, economic, cultural and political events. The campus offers a complete range of services, all of which share a common goal: meeting the needs of a large student population. Total enrollment: 30,000. For more information, visit the International Programs Office or visit www.unicatt.it.

Netherlands

Universiteit van Tilburg, Netherlands: Through a 2007 ISEP focused exchange Bellarmine Business and Economics students have the opportunity to study at Universiteit van Tilburg, an AACSB accredited school. Originally established in 1927 as a school of economics, Tilburg has since diversified its curriculum to include several main faculties, as well as special research programs and institutes. The Faculty of Economics and Business Administration offers two certificate programs each semester: the International Business Administration Diploma and the European Economics and Finance Certificate. A large number of research institutions are directly allied to Tilburg including the Center for Economic Research, one of the top institutes for fundamental economic research in Europe. Universiteit van Tilburg is also an excellent choice for Bellarmine students given that it is also a private university of Catholic affiliation. For more information contact the International Programs Office or visit www.tilburguniversity.nl.

Scotland

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland: TBA 2011

Spain

Universidad de Salamanca, Spain: Through a 2002 bilateral agreement of educational and cultural exchange between Bellarmine University and the Universidad de Salamanca, Bellarmine students have an opportunity to study at one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in the world. Today, the University of Salamanca is Spain’s leading national institution for teaching Spanish to foreign students, having been designated by the Spanish government to create an innovative educational program for foreigners to learn Spanish. Students fluent in Spanish who wish to participate at a superior level may direct enroll in classes with Spanish students. Other students may take courses designed exclusively for international students taught by University of Salamanca’s professors. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.usal.es.

Universidad de Granada, Spain: Bellarmine students have an excellent opportunity to study in Spain as a result of a 2009 bilateral agreement with the Universidad Granada, one of Spain’s foremost institutions. Universidad Granada was founded in 1531 by the papal bull of Pope Clemente VII. Students at the intermediate levels may take Spanish as a foreign language courses and advanced students may direct enroll in university classes at with Spanish students. The university is located in the city of Granada, Spain, a university city that is convenient for those who are looking for a diverse landscape. Granada is 40 minutes from the Mediterranean Sea by car, and is about 30 minutes from the Sierra Nevada Mountains. For more information contact the International Programs Office or visit www.ugr.es.ugr.

The Center for Cross Cultural Studies (CC-CS): This is a consortium of U.S. universities offering extensive study of Spanish as a foreign language in Alicante and Seville, Spain; Cordoba, Argentina; and Havana, Cuba. Classes are taught by native speakers. Bellarmine students can choose to participate in an academic year, semester, summer, or winter program. This is a study abroad program and the cost structure and credit transfer are slightly different than for exchanges. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.spanishstudies.org.

Sweden

Linköping University: TBA 2011

NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA

Argentina/Cuba

The Center for Cross Cultural Studies (CC-CS): This is a consortium of U.S. universities offering extensive study of Spanish as a foreign language in Seville, Spain; Cordoba, Argentina; and Havana, Cuba. Classes are taught by native speakers. Bellarmine students can choose to participate in an academic year, semester, summer, or winter program. This is a study abroad program and the cost structure and credit transfer are slightly different than for exchanges. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit www.spanishstudies.org.

Ecuador

Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador: Through a 2000 bilateral exchange agreement with the Universidad San Francisco de Quito, located in one of Louisville’s sister cities, Bellarmine students have the opportunity to study for one or two semesters at one of the most dynamic educational institutions in Latin America. USFQ is an institution of 2200 students, offering 39 undergraduate majors and 6 masters programs. This liberal arts university has many valuable resources, such as professors from the best universities in the world, the most modern library and computer services in Ecuador, and one of the most beautiful campuses in Latin America. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or www.usfq.edu.ec.

OCEANIA

Australia

Curtin University, Perth, Australia. Through a 1997 bilateral agreement with Curtin University which is located in Western Australia, Bellarmine students have access to study in a variety of academic areas in an English speaking setting. Curtin University has a well-known Nursing program, and the Business School ranks among the top three in Australia. Tuition is the same as study on campus at Bellarmine. Room and board expenses differ from those at Bellarmine. Check with IPO for details. See also www.curtin.edu.au.

Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia: Through a 2005 bilateral exchange agreement with Swinburne University, Bellarmine students can experience a diverse institution in Australia’s second largest city, which, like Louisville, is famous for horse racing. Swinburne, founded in 1908, is located in the eastern suburb of Hawthorn in Melbourne, a city of about 3.5 million. Swinburne has a strong history of providing quality, career-oriented education for both undergraduates and postgraduates. For more information, visit the International Programs Office or visit: www.swinburne.edu.au.

Edith Cowan University, Australia: Bellarmine students now have an additional opportunity to study in Australia as a result of a 2008 bilateral agreement with Edith Cowan University. The university’s origins go back to 1902 when it began as a teaching college. Today it is Western Australia’s second largest university with approximately 23,000 students, including in excess of 3,000 students originating from more than 80 countries. Edith Cowan University is located in Perth, the capital city of Western Australia, a gateway to Asia. Perth is one of the most affordable and attractive places to live. For more information contact the International Programs Office or visit www.ecu.edu.au.

University of Notre Dame Australia, Freemantle, Australia: The University of Notre Dame Australia, founded in 1989, has three campuses located in Freemantle, Sydney, and Broome. Through a bilateral agreement in 2011, Bellarmine students have the opportunity to study at this Catholic institution, which has strong areas in professional programs (Health Sciences, Education, Law), arts and sciences, humanities, theology, philosophy and social sciences. Students interested in Australian culture have a wide range of courses from which to choose. Exchange students are able to become involved with campus life in many ways through clubs, sports, Campus Ministry and volunteering. For more information, contact the IPO or visit www.nd.edu.au.

University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia:The University of Western Australia is one of the top research institutions in Australia as a member of Group of Eight (http://www.go8.edu.au/). Through a 2011 bilateral agreement, Bellarmine students can study at this high-quality, world-class institution in the arts and sciences, education, business, social science, health sciences and humanities. Students can become involved through clubs, sports, and cultural activities taking place on campus and in the city of Perth. For more information, contact the IPO or visit www.uwa.edu.au.

Australian Catholic University, TBA 2011: Founded in 1990 by combining six colleges around Australia, Australian Catholic University is a leading Catholic university in Australia and around the world. Bellarmine students can student at one of the six campuses around Australia in disciplines such as the arts and sciences, business, education, health sciences, and the humanities, including theology and philosophy.  With an 18 to 1 student to staff ratio, students receive the same type of attention as they do here at Bellarmine. There are many campus life activities for students in which they can participate, such as mentoring programs and social events. For more information, contact the IPO or visit http://www.acu.edu.au.

New Zealand

University of Canterbury, New Zealand: The University of Canterbury at Christchurch (UC) is Bellarmine’s first partner in New Zealand. As a result of a 2008 agreement, Bellarmine students may study abroad at an excellent institution in this beautiful country. Established in 1873, Canterbury College, as the University was originally known, was only the second university in New Zealand. UC is known for world-class research, inspirational teaching, a vibrant campus environment, and a great student lifestyle with students from around the world. In addition, UC’s Biology and Sustainability departments are world-renowned making it an excellent choice for science majors. With 12,000 students enrolled, UC offers undergraduate and postgraduate courses in some 50 disciplines, from accounting to zoology. The fees are slightly different than for exchange programs. For more information contact the International Programs Office or visit www.canterbury.ac.nz.

Semester and Academic Year Application Information

General Prerequisites: Study abroad during the academic year is available to any student who has studied at Bellarmine University at least two semesters and who is in good academic and social standing, with a minimum grade point average of 2.75. For study within a non-English speaking curriculum, proficiency in the language of study is a prerequisite. Minimum proficiency is demonstrated through the successful completion of four semesters of college-level study or its equivalent.

Cost: Generally speaking, the cost of a semester or academic year abroad is about the same as study at the Bellarmine campus (Bellarmine tuition, room and board, and student fees). The only additional cost a student will incur is approximately $500 in processing fees and health insurance plus transportation expenses to and from the study site.

Financial Aid/Scholarships: Most forms of financial aid are applicable to the ISEP and bilateral exchange programs. Study abroad scholarships of up to $10,000 are available to Bellarmine students on a competitive basis from a variety of sources. Please consult our website for the most up-to-date information, www.bellarmine.edu/international/studya/.

Academic Credit: All acceptable credits earned during a student’s study abroad are transferred back to Bellarmine University as official credit earned toward graduation, provided the student participated in a Bellarmine approved program.

Application Procedures: At least one year prior to the intended study abroad (generally sophomore year), a student interested in studying abroad should contact the International Programs Office and the study abroad faculty liaison for their major. In consultation with the student and the student’s academic advisor, the International Programs Office will assist the student in the study site selection process as well as in the design of the program of studies and general preparation for the entire experience, which ideally takes place during the junior year. Computer access to all partner universities is available on the web, www.bellarmine.edu/international/studya . University catalogs are available via the internet. Hard copies of some catalogs are available for reference in the IPO resource room, Miles 122. By November 30 of the year preceding the exchange, the student must submit an official study abroad application to Bellarmine University and must pay all application and placement fees for consideration of study during the following year. At the time of application for study abroad, the student will pay Bellarmine University a non-refundable administration fee. This is followed by regular tuition, as well as room and board billing if applicable, upon acceptance by the host institution. A student from a foreign country will make a similar arrangement with his or her home institution. Bilateral students will pay $300* per semester or $500* per academic year. ISEP students will pay the ISEP placement fee plus a BU study abroad fee of $100* per semester. (*subject to change)

Application link: www.bellarmine.edu/Libraries/International_Docs/BUGeneralApplicationtoStudyAbroad.sflb.ashx

Summer and Winter Break Programs

A variety of summer and winter break international experience opportunities are available to Bellarmine students. These programs last from 2-10 weeks and are offered in countries around the globe such as Australia, Austria, Brazil, China, England, France, Germany, Morocco, Turkey, and many more. Knowledge of a foreign language is not required for most programs. The Short Term Study Abroad Fee is $50 per program.

Kentucky Institute for International Studies (KIIS). Study abroad through KIIS is available in four to six week summer programs in Argentina, Austria, Brazil, China, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, Poland, Spain and Turkey through Bellarmine’s membership in the Kentucky Institute for International Studies, a consortium of mostly Kentucky colleges and universities. A student can earn up to six hours of transfer credit in most academic areas, with emphasis on providing opportunities for foreign language and culture study. Program costs range from around $2000 in Mexico to around $4500 at the European and Asian sites. In most cases, costs represent air fare, room and board, and up to six hours of transfer credit. Applications and brochures are available in October in the International Programs Office, as well as online under www.kiis.org.

Center for Cooperative Study Abroad (CCSA). Study and internships in England, Scotland, Ireland, New Zealand, Belize, Australia, Ghana, Hong Kong, Canada, Jamaica, and South Africa are available through Bellarmine’s membership in the Cooperative Center for Study Abroad (CCSA) during the summer and winter breaks, with courses representing a variety of academic areas, including business, marketing, management, health care, social sciences, and the liberal arts. Program costs range from $3000 to $5600, plus 50% of the cost of Bellarmine tuition. All credits and grades are transferred to Bellarmine. Applications and brochures are available in October in the International Programs Office, as well as under www.ccsa.cc.

The Center for Cross Cultural Studies (CC-CS): This is a consortium of U.S. universities offering extensive study of Spanish as a foreign language in Alicante and Seville, Spain; Cordoba, Argentina; and Havana, Cuba. Classes are taught by native speakers. Bellarmine students can choose to participate in an academic year, semester, summer, or winter program. For more information, contact the International Programs Office or visit: www.spanishstudies.org.

Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE): Founded in 1947, CIEE is a consortium of U.S. colleges and universities, including Bellarmine, providing summer and semester study, internships, field projects, intensive language study, and a variety of courses in the liberal arts, business and economic development, as well as social and natural sciences at its international study centers, as well as over 600 volunteer opportunities for Service Learning around the globe. Summer study is available in Brazil, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, France, Spain, Thailand, and Tunisia and in academic areas not served by KIIS or CCSA. Semester study and/or academic year study is available mostly in countries throughout the world not served by ISEP. Credits earned abroad are evaluated on an individual basis. Program costs vary greatly. For details, please contact the IPO. See also www.ciee.org.

BU Tropical Biology Field Study in the Bahamas and Belize: Bellarmine offers a two-credit organized field studies course (BIOL 226), in which students study the diverse habitats (coral reefs, tidal pools, mangrove swamps, turtle grass beds, rocky shores, sandy beaches, inland lakes, and terrestrial zones) abroad on the tropical island of San Salvador in the Bahamas. Prerequisites: BIOL 225 and consent of instructor. This program alternates between the Bahamas and Belize.

BU Physical Therapy Experience in Australia: This is an intensive three week experience in Perth, Australia hosted by Curtin University. Junior and senior physical therapy students will spend three weeks learning about the practice of physical therapy in Australia. Students will have the opportunity to experience socialized medicine, rural healthcare in the outback and physical therapy education from an Australian perspective. For more information, please contact: Dr. David Boyce, PT, ECS, OCS for more information 502.452.8373 or contact Bellarmine’s International Programs Office.

BU Community Health Nursing Study in Ecuador: This is an intensive three week study in Louisville’s sister city Quito, Ecuador. Students can earn up to 8 hours of required nursing credits in a full immersion cultural setting in Latin America. Some knowledge of Spanish is helpful. Students study at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador, engage in fieldwork and are housed with Ecuadorian families. For more information, please contact Bellarmine’s International Programs Office in Miles Hall.

BU Business Program in Italy, Austria, France and Germany: This is an intensive 3-week experience in four European countries. Students can earn up to 6 hours of credit in an immersion setting in Europe. No prior language experience is required. Students stay in Florence, Milan, Kufstein, Munich, and Strasbourg at Bellarmine partner universities, and participate in excursions as part of their courses while accompanied by BU professors. For more information, please contact Bellarmine’s International Programs Office in Miles Hall.

Other Opportunities

In addition to the opportunities listed above, other study abroad opportunities are available through IFSA, ISA, IES, the American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS) and a myriad of other programs, although transfer of credit and financial aid cannot be guaranteed with non-affiliated programs. Current information about such opportunities is posted in the International Programs Office in Miles Hall, in Financial Aid in Horrigam Hall 202, on the Study Abroad Board in the Student Center in Frazier Hall, the Campus Center living room, and Bellarmine’s website.

Short Term Program Application Information

Short term program brochures are typically available in September. Application deadlines for summer programs are in February and for winter programs they are in late September and October.

General Pre-requisites: In order to be eligible to participate students must have a 2.5 GPA and be in good social standing. Some destinations may have a language prerequisite or may be restricted to upper level students.

Cost/Financial Aid/Scholarships: The cost for these programs varies from $2,000- $6,000. If a student is enrolled as a full time summer students (6 credit hours) he/she may be eligible for summer financial aid. The students should check with the Financial Aid Office for their status and options. Many scholarships are available for both summer and winter programs. Students should consult the following webpage for more information on qualifications and deadlines: www.bellarmine.edu/international/scholarships.aspx.  

Application Procedures: Students are encouraged to start planning early and to attend the study abroad fair in October and to meet with the Study Abroad Coordinator to discuss options and application procedures. Required forms will vary depending on the program. All students will need to submit a copy of the program application form and complete the following: the Bellarmine Study Abroad Application, the Bellarmine Release Agreement, the Emergency Contact Form and the pre-departure attendance form.